Android heap monitoring

 

Android Debug Bridge (adb) is a versatile command-line tool that lets you communicate with a device (an emulator or a connected Android device). The adb command facilitates a variety of device actions, such as installing and debugging apps, and it provides access to a Unix shell that you can use to run a variety of commands on a device. It is a client-server program that includes three components:

adb is included in the Android SDK Platform-Tools package. You can download this package with the SDK Manager , which installs it at android_sdk /platform-tools/ . Or if you want the standalone Android SDK Platform-Tools package, you can download it here .

When you start an adb client, the client first checks whether there is an adb server process already running. If there isn't, it starts the server process. When the server starts, it binds to local TCP port 5037 and listens for commands sent from adb clients—all adb clients use port 5037 to communicate with the adb server.

Android heap monitoring

Digest authentication scheme as defined in RFC 2617.  DigestSchemeFactory   DigitalClock This class was deprecated in API level 17. It is recommended you use TextClock instead.   DigitsKeyListener For digits-only text entry

Android Debug Bridge (adb) is a versatile command-line tool that lets you communicate with a device (an emulator or a connected Android device). The adb command facilitates a variety of device actions, such as installing and debugging apps, and it provides access to a Unix shell that you can use to run a variety of commands on a device. It is a client-server program that includes three components:

adb is included in the Android SDK Platform-Tools package. You can download this package with the SDK Manager , which installs it at android_sdk /platform-tools/ . Or if you want the standalone Android SDK Platform-Tools package, you can download it here .

When you start an adb client, the client first checks whether there is an adb server process already running. If there isn't, it starts the server process. When the server starts, it binds to local TCP port 5037 and listens for commands sent from adb clients—all adb clients use port 5037 to communicate with the adb server.

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You need to have a working ethminer installation which comes with the c++ eth version of Ethereum. For installation instructions see ethereum.org/cli .

To join the pool start up ethminer using the -F flag and point it to on of the following servers: China (Beijing): http://cn1.ethermine.org:5555/<account>.<worker> India (Mumbai): http://india1.ethermine.org:5555/<account>.<worker> North America (East): http://us1.ethermine.org:5555/<account>.<worker> North America (West): http://us2.ethermine.org:5555/<account>.<worker> Europe (France): http://eu1.ethermine.org:5555/<account>.<worker> Europe (Germany): http://eu2.ethermine.org:5555/<account>.<worker> Asia: http://asia1.ethermine.org:5555/<account>.<worker>

Android Monitor provides a Memory Monitor so you can more easily monitor app performance and memory usage to find deallocated objects, locate memory leaks, and track the amount of memory the connected device is using. The Memory Monitor reports how your app allocates memory and helps you to visualize the memory your app uses. It lets you:

The Java heap data shows in real-time what types of objects your application has allocated, how many, and their sizes on the heap. Viewing the heap helps you to:

Allocation tracking records app memory allocations and lists all allocations for the profiling cycle, including the call stack, size, and allocating code. It helps you to: