Spy software torque converter for 4l60e

 

(Written By:  Matt Saternus ) In two recent MyGolfSpy Labs, we’ve talked about the impact of shaft flex and shaft weight .  The data we gathered showing the importance of fitting for the right flex and weight was shocking: we saw testers gain or lose 20 yards or more with the wrong flex or weight .  Today, we discuss torque, which may be the least understood, and possibly most important variable in making your drives long and straight.

Some of you know what torque is, some of you have seen the word on shaft spec sheets, but the majority of you are probably encountering it for the first time.  Torque is really pretty simple: it’s the shaft’s resistance to twisting. Torque is measured in degrees (meaning: how many degrees will the shaft twist under a certain amount of force), and you’ll typically see measurements as low as 2° and as high as 5°, 6°, or 7°.

As with many other things, these numbers don’t necessarily mean a lot because there’s not a standard way to measure, but I’ve already done that rant .

Spy software torque converter for 4l60e

We get another glimpse at the next generation of GM heavy duty trucks. These should be designated as the 2017 Chevy Silverado HD and 2017 GMC Sierra HD, although there is no official word on this yet. We first saw similar prototypes testing in July of 2014 . These test mules now have black tape on the grilles, but the hood covers with a peculiar center cutout are still there.

Judging by the big DEF tanks under the passenger side, these trucks are testing the latest version of the Duramax turbo-diesels. Can the next V8 Duramax challenge the Ram and Ford with close to 900 lb-ft of torque? If it does, then it’s understandable that it may need an extra cooling duct in the hood. Who knows, perhaps there is nothing there or it is simply a new style item.

These prototypes are towing all kinds of trailers: flat-bed, utility box, and gooseneck trailers. They are also 3500 Dually prototypes in this bunch.

(Written By:  Matt Saternus ) In two recent MyGolfSpy Labs, we’ve talked about the impact of shaft flex and shaft weight .  The data we gathered showing the importance of fitting for the right flex and weight was shocking: we saw testers gain or lose 20 yards or more with the wrong flex or weight .  Today, we discuss torque, which may be the least understood, and possibly most important variable in making your drives long and straight.

Some of you know what torque is, some of you have seen the word on shaft spec sheets, but the majority of you are probably encountering it for the first time.  Torque is really pretty simple: it’s the shaft’s resistance to twisting. Torque is measured in degrees (meaning: how many degrees will the shaft twist under a certain amount of force), and you’ll typically see measurements as low as 2° and as high as 5°, 6°, or 7°.

As with many other things, these numbers don’t necessarily mean a lot because there’s not a standard way to measure, but I’ve already done that rant .

The 2015 Ford F150 is still new enough that the masses haven’t started bugging for new features, but in understanding that the highly contested half ton truck market, Ford Motor Company has made some changes for the 2016 model year to stay one step ahead of the competition. None of these changes are all that impactful, but they should all help to keep F150 sales on the rise into next year.

The 5 Changes for the 2016 F150
At first glance, it will be hard to tell the 2015 and 2016 Ford F150 apart, but there are 6 changes for 2016 that should make a difference on the sales sheets. This includes new exterior colors, new special edition appearance packages, the new trailer backup assist feature, a new infotainment system, a natural gas prep package and – most importantly – a new premium trimline for those folks looking for a more luxurious experience from their new F150.

New Exterior Colors
The 2016 Ford F150 will be available in two new exterior colors, Shadow Black and Lithium Gray. Tuxedo Black and Guard Metallic are being removed to make room in the color palate for the new hues.

Getting more distance off the tee is easy right?  Well, golf companies sure would like you to believe that...they have us feeling as if the equation is as simple as...longer drivers = longer drives.    Not so fast cowboy! As recently as the early-90s, most standard off-the-rack drivers were 43" - 43.5".  That number has since jumped up to around 46".  But, remember humans don't evolve that quickly...we aren't getting taller but clubs sure are getting longer.  So the question we wanted to answer for everyone ..."Is Longer Really Longer?"

If you've ever read anything Tom Wishon has written about driver length, or spoken to your local fitter about the topic, there's a curious statistic that you've probably encountered.

Think about that for a second. The very best players in the world, guys who hit the sweet spot on their driver as easily as most of us would hit water after falling from a cruise ship, guys who routinely drive the ball to distances that some reading this would need two swings to achieve are playing drivers upwards of 1.5" shorter than what most of the rest of us have in our bags right now.

The Mercedes-AMG GT was introduced in 2014 as a successor to the SLS AMG. The second sports car developed entirely in-house by AMG, the GT is the first vehicle to wear the "Mercedes-AMG" nomenclature and the first to use the brand-new, twin-turbo, 4.0-liter V-8 engine. Although it replaces the SLS AMG, the AMG GT is actually smaller and aimed at a different market, with the Porsche 911 being its most important competitor. Following the release of the hotter GT R version in 2016, Mercedes-Benz unleashed the Roadster version ahead of the 2016 Paris Motor Show.

Although at some point it was rumored that Mercedes would skip on building an AMG GT Roadster in order to protect its slow-selling SL-Class Roadster, the drop-top was confirmed earlier in 2016 by a batch of spy shots and a leaked strategy document that said it would arrive in dealerships in 2017.

The fact that Mercedes also developed a roadster version of the sports car makes a lot of sense since Mercedes-AMG developed the GT with the Porsche 911 Turbo in mind. With Stuttgart also offering a drop-top version of its range-topping model, Mercedes was compelled to do the same in order to remain competitive. As expected, the Roadster uses the same greasy bits to move about, including the twin-turbocharged, 4.0-liter V-8.