Nokia cell tracking 20 dollar bills

 

Today, the humble smartphone that made an unintentionally spectacular first impression is shipping in a limited release around the world and doing its level best not to disrupt Nokia’s big WP7 launch plans later in the month. That makes the N9 a niche product if you’re just after phone buying advice, but if you care about real advances in smartphone UI concepts and perhaps a hint of what we can expect in Nokia’s Windows Phones, you’ll want to read this review.

I say this without any qualification: the Nokia N9 is beautiful. Everything about this phone’s design exudes elegance and harmony. Lines flow seamlessly into one another, fit and finish is perfect, and the feel in the hand is sublime. Aside from the intentionally squared off top and bottom, there are no straight edges on the N9. It’s evocative of supercar design in the way it simply transitions from one curve to another, albeit in the pursuit of a cohesive, unified look rather than aerodynamic excellence.

One thing undermining the N9′s imaging performance is the phone’s inconsistent ambient light sensor. All too often it takes the shadow of your hovering finger as indication that the handset has moved to a darker setting and aggressively dials down the brightness of the display. The resulting and annoying fluctuation in brightness marks a jarring departure from the N9′s overall theme of harmonious excellence.

Nokia cell tracking 20 dollar bills

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Today, the humble smartphone that made an unintentionally spectacular first impression is shipping in a limited release around the world and doing its level best not to disrupt Nokia’s big WP7 launch plans later in the month. That makes the N9 a niche product if you’re just after phone buying advice, but if you care about real advances in smartphone UI concepts and perhaps a hint of what we can expect in Nokia’s Windows Phones, you’ll want to read this review.

I say this without any qualification: the Nokia N9 is beautiful. Everything about this phone’s design exudes elegance and harmony. Lines flow seamlessly into one another, fit and finish is perfect, and the feel in the hand is sublime. Aside from the intentionally squared off top and bottom, there are no straight edges on the N9. It’s evocative of supercar design in the way it simply transitions from one curve to another, albeit in the pursuit of a cohesive, unified look rather than aerodynamic excellence.

One thing undermining the N9′s imaging performance is the phone’s inconsistent ambient light sensor. All too often it takes the shadow of your hovering finger as indication that the handset has moved to a darker setting and aggressively dials down the brightness of the display. The resulting and annoying fluctuation in brightness marks a jarring departure from the N9′s overall theme of harmonious excellence.